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[tourismindonesia] 'Orgasm Lady' tells the women of Indonesia to fight for their rights with SEX



***While Indonesia's economy has raced ahead over the past decade, critics say old-fashioned social attitudes persist and women are often subject to prudish scrutiny about their behaviour. 


'Orgasm Lady' tells the women of Indonesia to fight for their rights with SEX 

  •  Firliana Purwanti, 39, says women need to demand fair share of orgasms
  •  She says equal pleasure in the bedroom will lead to equal rights in society
  •  Indonesia is a largely conservative nation where sex is rarely mentioned  
PUBLISHED: 03:01 GMT, 13 September 2016 UPDATED: 16:02 GMT, 13 September 2016

Women in Indonesia are being told to speak up in the bedroom and demand their fair share of orgasms as part of a wider campaign for gender equality. 
Firliana Purwanti, a campaigner and author who is widely known as the 'Orgasm Lady', is on a mission to tell women in an overwhelmingly conservative Muslim nation that insisting on more pleasure in the bedroom can help them achieve equality in society in general.
Ms Purwanti's approach is unconventional in a country where open discussion of sex is frowned upon.
Woman soldiers march during a parade in a ceremony commemorating the foundation of the Indonesian Air Force. Virginity tests are widespread for unmarried women seeking to join the military and the police
Woman soldiers march during a parade in a ceremony commemorating the foundation of the Indonesian Air Force. Virginity tests are widespread for unmarried women seeking to join the military and the police
The 39-year-old is also urging women to stand up against demeaning practices such as virginity tests for women who want to join Indonesia's military or the police force.
She said: 'Your body, your sexual pleasure is your autonomy. The state has nothing to do with it. 
'Pleasure is a human right. My ambition is for all women to have orgasms, because that's the ultimate indicator they are empowered.' 
Last year Inspector General Moechgiyarto told The Guardian virginity tests were conducted under 'health condition requirements' for female police candidates and were necessary to prevent sex workers entering the police academy.

Ms Purwanti wrote The O Project in 2010, a best-selling book documenting the sexual experiences of 16 Indonesian women. 
She interviewed 14 Indonesian women from Aceh to Sulawesi about their orgasms. 
Ms Purwanti said: 'My fear was they would be too shy to answer my questions. I was surprised that they were happy to talk. 
'Most laughed a lot while discussing their orgasms. Nobody had ever asked them about this, not even their partners. They loved answering my questions because, finally, someone cared about their pleasure.'  
She said the ritual of female genital mutilation (FGM) was still practised in some parts of Indonesia and many men equated women who enjoyed sex with promiscuity or low morals. 

Indonesia's top court is currently hearing a petition from conservative Islamic activists lobbying to outlaw sex outside marriage.
Ms Purwanti - whose day job as a development worker includes tackling natural disasters - said her campaign was to push back against Indonesia's obsession with virginity.
Over half her Facebook followers are male and she says: 'All this while we have been trying to engage men in the women's movement, it's very difficult. But when it comes to sex, they are engaged immediately.'
About 5,000 copies of her book were snapped up by readers soon after the launch and it was translated into English last year. 
She has since been invited to share her campaign on different stages, including at the Jakarta version of popular speaker series TED Talks and by a top local cosmetics brand.
Ms Purwanti, who recently got divorced after a nine-year marriage, plans to stand for parliament in the next national election, due in 2019, on a women's rights platform.
Indonesia was ranked 92nd out of 145 countries in the World Economic Forum's 2015 Gender Gap Index, and only 54 percent of women work, compared with 86 percent of men.
While Indonesia's economy has raced ahead over the past decade, critics say old-fashioned social attitudes persist and women are often subject to prudish scrutiny about their behaviour. 





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